Heintz & Becker Brain Injury Series Part 1: The Silent Epidemic

By Steve Heintz of Heintz & Becker

We decided to launch our newest series of blogs on the subject of brain injury for three main reasons.  First, the most common causes of traumatic brain injury in the general population are motor vehicle and motorcycle accidents.

Second, we now know for a fact that there is really no such thing as a “minor” brain injury – all brain injuries are serious and can have long-term effects.  And third, advances in medical tools and scientific knowledge are giving doctors greater abilities to document and diagnose brain injuries than ever existed before.

Traumatic brain injury is caused by some kind of sudden trauma to the head, and its symptoms can range from mild to moderate to severe. Common symptoms include headache, confusion, lightheadedness, dizziness, blurry vision, energy loss, sleep changes, changes in behavior, and memory or cognition impairment.

Traumatic brain injury is often called the silent epidemic because its long-term complications are often undiagnosed and untreated.  Recent advancements in understanding brain injuries are shedding light on the differences between brain injuries and other injuries, like broken bones.  Most broken bones will heal and completely return to their normal function.

In contrast, it is now a known fact even a “mild” concussion of the brain can result in long term damage and trigger progressive neurological deterioration over time.  Returning to normal after a brain injury may take months or years, and even then, “normal” may never be what it was before.

While insurance companies have historically been successful in under-compensating brain injury victims, new levels of understanding and medical advancements are leveling the playing field and giving a voice to victims of the silent epidemic.

If you or a member of your family has suffered a brain injury in an accident caused by someone else’s negligence, the injury attorneys at Heintz & Becker are familiar with the latest advancements in proving the full extent of the damages and long-term consequences that can result after a brain injury.  Contact us to learn more about how we may be able to help you and your family members receive full compensation for your claims.

Source(s): Brain Injury Professional, “Rethinking Brain Injury”, posted in October, 2015 issue; National Center for Biotechnology Information, “Diagnostic confirmation of mild traumatic brain injury by diffusion tensor imaging: a case report”, posted February 16, 2012