Head On Collisions Most Common for Motorcyclists

The roads are dangerous for everyone. And while cars and trucks dominate the road, there are plenty of motorcycles, bicyclists, and pedestrians weaving in and out of traffic zones too—meaning that anyone who is driving must be alert; unfortunately, in today’s driving climate it often seems that is the last thing on anyone’s mind. Cars are decked out with all the latest electronics, meaning there are complex stereo systems and DVD players to be tended to, not to mention the ever-present cell phone presenting the ongoing temptation to talk and text (or even email and surf online). Distractions cause thousands of deaths each year on the roads of the US—many of which could be prevented.

Motorcyclists Are More Vulnerable in a Crash

Speeding, driving under the influence, and other reckless behaviors continue to threaten travelers, but some are more vulnerable than others. Motorcyclists fit notably into this category as they move along on the roads and highways at the same speed as cars and trucks and in the same traffic zones—but their vehicles are exponentially lighter and offer significantly less protection, putting them in greater danger for injury and even death.

Head-On Collisions Often Occur at Intersections

While everyone should be driving defensively, motorcyclists must take extra care to make sure they are visible. This means wearing brightly colored clothing whenever possible, using neon strips on helmets, boots, or the bike itself, and adding extra lights. Visibility can be even more challenging in traffic areas such as intersections where head-on collisions are most common due to motorists being surprised by a smaller vehicle such as a motorcycle in their path. This is often compounded by speeding or other careless driving. Any type of head-on collision has the potential to be catastrophic, but if a motorcyclist is involved, the results can be fatal or seriously debilitating, to include spinal injuries, traumatic brain injuries, broken bones, road rash, and more.

If you ride a motorcycle, make sure to be both seen (bright colors) and heard (revving the engine when necessary), avoid getting into blind spots where a motorist cannot see you, and give cars plenty of distance. Because intersections and other traffic stops tend to be areas more prone to crashes, make eye contact with motorists before turning whenever you can.

Contact Us for Help!

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

 

Motorcyclists: Know How to Read the Road

With millions of automobiles on the road today, sometimes there is a thrill in being different. Some prefer to take public transportation, while other travelers and commuters walk or bicycle everywhere. Motorcycles are extremely popular though, with over 8 million registered in the US, and many owners enjoying not only a different form of transportation, but a whole different lifestyle.

Although the biker image still prevails in many cases—especially with black leather jackets, pants, and heavy boots as protective gear—for people of all ages, careers, and cultures, there is a deep sense of fellowship. Accompanying that are so many other pros to riding, from all that outdoorsy healthy stuff like fresh air and seeing the countryside, to the physical workout experienced on every trip, the economics (less gas, cheaper maintenance, and less investment to begin with), and even a sense of spirituality or Zen.

The most significant con to riding a motorcycle is the safety issue. Even if you are a pro and have been riding for decades, chances are you have a few stories to tell when it comes to accidents. Unfortunately, other motorists are one of the biggest dangers to motorcycle enthusiasts—and because of this you must drive as defensively as possible, always assuming other vehicles are not watching out for you.

Learning to read the road is vital and centered around safety. Although most new drivers and motorcyclists are required to take educational courses, there’s nothing like experience! Getting to know your bike thoroughly before you head out onto the road is critical, along with wearing the proper gear, and making sure your motorcycle is in good working order.

Be visible to other drivers, follow all traffic rules, and be apprised of current weather conditions. Once on the road, each journey is much more complex than just getting from point A to point B. You must constantly assess other drivers:

  • Be sure you have enough space in front of and behind you and cars on the road.
  • Make eye contact if possible with other drivers in their rearview or side mirrors to ensure you are not in their blind spots.
  • Take extra care at intersections, especially left turns.
  • Be awake, alert, and never drive under the influence.

In most cases, ‘reading the road’ means reading other drivers! While you must follow the traffic rules, the speed limits, avoid impairing substances, and be completely aware of your surroundings always, you must also overcompensate for drivers who may be extremely distracted with smartphones or other electronics—or they may be speeding and neglect to see you. They may be inexperienced, tired, or driving drunk. Being hypervigilant about safety while riding your motorcycle can make the difference between arriving home alive or becoming another fatality on Florida roads.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

 

Facial Fractures Commonly Caused by Motorcycle Accidents

As a motorcyclist, you probably enjoy a lot more than just driving back and forth to work every day. Although a faster and more economical commute makes traveling on two wheels enticing, most of the country can be enjoyed by motorcycle—including over 100 scenic byways and other roads that allow for hours of fresh air and breathtaking landscapes. The health benefits abound too, from the amount of mental acuity required during each ride to strength built in the core and legs.

Motorcyclists report feeling a great sense of freedom, traveling unfettered by the protection of a car—as well as feeling camaraderie with other riders out on the roads. The flip side of all the goodness experienced in riding, however, is an ongoing concern for safety. All the features that offer such a sense of freedom in travel can also be a major downfall if safety procedures are not followed or if you are struck by a car or truck.

You may have read some of our previous blogs regarding typical injuries caused by motorcycle crashes, with broken bones—and especially broken legs—being common. Along with serious neck and spinal injuries, and issues like the dreaded road rash, facial fractures are often the unfortunate result of a crash also. The nose, being much more vulnerable, may be broken, with accompanying swelling, pain, and black eyes. The forehead may be fractured too, along with the eye sockets, cheekbone, and/or jaw.

Many facial fractures are mild, but others can be so serious they cause death or significant disfigurement. Damage to the face may also include problems with eyesight or total blindness, as well as impeding talking, breathing, and eating. If you have any question about injury after a traffic accident, seek medical help as soon as possible. Symptoms of a facial fracture may include bruising around the face and eyes, nosebleeds or the nose appearing crooked and out of alignment, numbness or tingling in various areas of the face, broken or chipped teeth or misalignment of the jaw, double vision, and problems with speech or swallowing.

Diagnosis usually includes CT scans or X-rays, and while treatment may involve pain relievers, steroids, or antibiotics, extensive reconstructive surgery could be required too. While it may be difficult to prevent such injuries in the case of a catastrophic crash, wearing a helmet can prevent facial injuries as well as traumatic brain injury.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Motorcyclist Fatalities and Accidents: Florida Leads

Motorcyclists enjoy so many benefits biking through the state of Florida, traveling from the beauty of the Florida Keys all the way through the panhandle; for many, it may seem inconceivable that there are so many motorcyclist fatalities. Unlike many other states, the ride occurs at sea level in many areas and is a straight shot on most roads, whether motorcyclists are enjoying a trip closer to the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean. Many of the highways are known for their interesting sights and unique beauty, such as the Overseas Highway, which is part of U.S. 1—or the A1A Scenic & Historic Coastal Byway ending in St. Augustine. Along with abundant sunshine, Florida is also rich with wildlife, varying landscapes, and history.

Whether you are a visitor or a resident though, understand the added dangers of motorcycling in the state of Florida as it continues to be one of the top areas not only for vacations—but motorcycle accidents too. Lumped in with Texas, California, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, data shows that Florida saw 10,331 motorcycle crashes in 2016. Out of those accidents, 459 resulted in fatalities.

Nearly tying with Texas for the highest number of motorcycle accidents, analysts have been busy trying to figure out why Florida is so dangerous—with traffic incidents on the rise, including hit and runs. Many see the good weather as a reason why there are more accidents and deaths for motorcyclists, simply because they are out more. Lack of helmet laws can certainly be to blame too. Although motorcyclists 20 and under must wear helmets, older riders may leave themselves vulnerable to greater injuries like traumatic brain injuries or death.

With a current population of over 21 million people, Florida roads are busy. If you are a motorist, practice extra caution to help motorcyclists such as keeping a safe distance, checking your blind spots, and doublechecking before making left turns. Motorcyclists should continue to make sure they have high visibility while on the roads, as well as maintaining safe speeds and paying extra attention when turning at intersections.

If you or a loved one have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

 

Motorcycle Safety Topics: Beware of That Blind Spot!

If you are thinking about getting a motorcycle, there is a lot to consider—and especially if you are new to the lifestyle. Along with finding a bike of proper size (and one that fits your budget), protective gear such as leather, boots, helmet, and goggles are all usually necessary too. Licensing requirements must be explored, and you may need to take an educational course also. After you have jumped through all those hoops, you may be ready to ride—but don’t forget about the most important conversation of all when it comes to biking: safety.

Florida Is One of the Top States for Motorcycle Accidents

There are so many benefits to riding a motorcycle, whether you do so for pleasure or consider it to be your preferred mode of transportation. Florida is full of scenic byways, no matter which coast you are traveling on, and motorcycle enthusiasts come from all over the country to enjoy riding with an even greater sense of freedom in the year-round sunshine and fresh, tropical air. It cannot be denied though that safety must be of the utmost priority. There are dangers involved in riding a motorcycle—and sadly, most of them are due to negligent motorists. Florida is also known as one of the most dangerous states (coming in tied for the number one spot with Texas) for motorcycle accidents and fatalities. The roads are busy, and they can be hazardous not only for motorcyclists, but also bicyclists and pedestrians.

Always Maintain Good Visibility for Motorists & Yourself

Visibility is always a main issue for bikes, as motorists are generally in the habit of looking for larger vehicles on the road and at intersections, despite continual safety information given to the public about watching for motorcycles. Aside from having additional lighting and wearing bright clothes (or even reflective material), it is critical to make sure motorists can see you in their mirrors. Avoiding blind spots means maneuvering correctly in your lane, and even trying to make eye contact with motorists as they look back. Remember that if you cannot see them in their mirrors, most likely they are not seeing you behind them on the road or traveling right next to them.

Keep a Healthy Distance from Other Vehicles

Always keep a safe distance from cars and other vehicles and have a buffer zone for being able to stop quickly and avoid a potential accident. If you are traveling with other motorcyclists, travel in a safe formation, keeping proper distance between your group and motorists. Find out more here about common injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, as well as what to do if you have been in a collision with a car.

Contact Us for Help Now

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, bicycle accident, pedestrian accident or car wreck due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Aggressive Drivers Are Added Threat to Motorcyclists

Traveling the roads to get from one destination to another is usually just a minor detail in our day. That can change all too quickly, however, in the case of an accident—and especially a serious one.

Traffic accidents continue to rise, and this means that smaller vehicles on the road like motorcycles are at even more risk each time they venture out.

One of the greatest safety threats to motorcyclists is other motorists on the road, and especially aggressive drivers.

Unfortunately, road rage and aggressive behaviors exhibited on the road are all too common. Drivers may be in a hurry to get to work, having an overall bad day, or suffering in the summer heat and lashing out. Road rage is often triggered in those who may have anger issues to begin with, and they feel comfortable acting belligerently from the protective confines of their own cars. This is problematic when one motorist begins raging on another—but when a motorcycle is involved, the consequences could be deadly.

Aggressive drivers may yell or gesture from within their cars and honk the horn initially; in fact, many motorists may consider this type of adversarial behavior to be completely normal, almost as if it is part of their driving persona. When the situation escalates to driving erratically to punish or chase another driver, the safety of a motorcyclist could be deeply threatened as they are pushed off the road, into guardrails, or into oncoming traffic.

The average car weighs over 4,000 pounds in comparison to a motorcycle weighing 400 to 500 pounds on average. A lot of damage can be done—and especially in an accident carried out deliberately by an enraged driver. In a motorcycle crash, the motorcyclists are prone to much more serious harm to include:

  • Traumatic brain injuries (hopefully prevented by a helmet)
  • Spinal cord and neck injuries and even paralysis
  • Broken bones (especially broken legs due to bikes falling on the motorcyclists)
  • Road rash and other burns and contusions
  • Facial fractures
  • Fatality

These types of incidents can be particularly dangerous for more inexperienced motorcyclists too, as they may have trouble maneuvering in normal situations, much less handling an aggressive situation.

Everyone on the road must remember to drive as defensively as possible, keeping in mind that all vehicles have a right to be there.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, bicycle accident, pedestrian accident or car wreck due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker.

We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Motorcycle Fatalities: Is Florida’s Year-Round Good Weather to Blame?

Overall, Florida has so much going for it as a state—evidenced by the millions of tourists who flock to the south for a wide range of different attractions, as well as so many who decide to retire there–but it is also becoming infamous for traffic problems and motorcycle fatalities. We’ve got some of the most famous amusement parks in the world, along with the best boating, fishing, and access to protected areas like the Everglades. Great restaurants, shopping, and world-class beaches abound.

Along with the continual influx of people visiting comes high volumes of traffic, which means increased accidents—and fatalities—whether they are car accidents, motorcycle crashes, or pedestrian or bicycle accidents. Unfortunately, such incidents just continue to rise in all areas, meaning that drivers must be more careful than ever on the roads. Motorcyclists must be incredibly defensive while traveling, no matter where they are, but with accidents (and deaths) continuing to trend upward, they must be even more diligent about watching out for what can be their greatest threat on the roads today: motorists.

The motorcyclist is much more vulnerable in traffic, traveling on what is usually a fairly lightweight vehicle in comparison to the average car. After a collision, broken legs and trauma to other limbs are common, along with traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, paralysis, and more. In an effort to curb accidents and deaths, experts continue to investigate why there would be an increase—especially with better safety devices in cars today and so much more public knowledge about the dangers of distracted and drunken driving, speeding, and other reckless behaviors.

And while all those behaviors still continue to top the list for the reasons why accidents continue to occur and increase, other more difficult-to-curb factors may be to blame. As the population of Florida continues to grow, there are more motorists on the road and that leads to more problems; however, the outdoorsy nature of Florida’s residents and visitors—combined with the famously good weather of the Sunshine State—means there is more time to be spent on the roads during the day and night. Even if it may not be sunny all the time, the subtropical climate is enticing to those who enjoy motorcycling and other outdoor activities.

If you are a motorcyclist, no matter the state, always be sure that you are visible to others on the road. Shift in lanes appropriately so you avoid getting into blind spots and make eye contact with motorists making left turns at intersections whenever possible. Always be alert, and wary of other drivers.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Motorcyclist Licensing: Understand the Requirements in Florida

While Florida may top the list in the country for accidents, to include cars, motorcyclists, pedestrians, bicyclists, and boats too, the beauty of the state itself and the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors continues to draw a growing population; in fact, Florida is one of the fastest growing states in the country today, with cities such as Tampa and Orlando exhibiting massive gains in new residents. More people means more traffic (and also, unfortunately, more accidents)—along with an influx of drivers looking into new licensing and registration.

For motorcyclists entering Florida or for residents just purchasing a bike, know what you will need in terms of pre-licensing education, licenses, and more. If you have just moved into the state, most likely you can look forward to skipping another driver’s course or having to take a test; however, that only applies if you come into Florida with a license/endorsement that is still valid. All you will need is your old license, and documents proving you are now a resident.

If you are a Florida driver with a FL Class E license (this is the basic non-commercial drivers license) adding a motorcycle onto your license as an endorsement, you are required by the State of Florida to complete an MSF Basic Rider Course. If you are over 18 and want a Motorcycle Only driver’s license, you must either already have a valid driver’s license or proceed to take the written knowledge exams, an MSF Basic Rider Course, and vision test. If you are a motorcyclist under 18 (with 16 being the youngest age you can apply), the State of Florida requires you to have a driver’s license for a minimum of one year with no moving violations.

Once you are out on the roads enjoying the fresh air and sunshine, remember that it is more important than ever to drive defensively, always watching for other motorists. Be visible by wearing bright colors and shifting in lanes when necessary, along with taking extra precautions at intersections by revving the engine, making sure your lights are on, and making eye contact with other drivers before turning.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Common Injuries from Motorcycle Accidents

Motorcycle riders are particularly vulnerable on our roadways due to their small size and lack of exterior safety. More than 80 percent of all reported motorcycle crashes result in injury or death to the motorcyclist.

The most common injuries from motorcycle accidents are:

Road Rash and Disfigurement

Road rash is a common injury among motorcycle riders. This injury occurs when skin makes contact with the road at high speeds. The resulting injury often leaves scars and disfigures a rider.

minor road rash injuryRoad rash isn’t fatal. However, some riders will suffer emotional damage due to permanent scarring or disfigurement. Riders who suffer road rash may also experience:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Pain
  • Discomfort

Minor road rash affects the top layers of skin (epidermis and dermis) and heals in a couple of weeks. Road rash that affects deep tissue requires a longer healing process.

Road rash can become infected throughout the healing process. Daily care is required to ensure best results and to mitigate scaring. It’s advised to see a doctor. A tetanus shot may be recommended.

Bone Fractures

Broken forearm from motorcycle accident xrayBone fractures, or broken bones, are also common motorcycle injuries. A bone fracture occurs when excessive pressure or blunt force changes the shape of bone—usually a break, crack, or shatter.

Falling riders extend their arms to protect themselves resulting in broken wrists and arms. Foot and leg fractures are also common among riders.

Recovery after a broken bone depends on the age and health of the rider.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, older riders sustain more serious injuries compared to young riders. In addition to reduced vision and reaction times, older riders are more likely to suffer broken bones and have longer recovery periods.

Bone fractures take anywhere from six to twelve weeks to heal, sometimes longer, depending on the type of fracture (i.e., open or compound, hairline, comminuted, etc.).

During recovery, daily activities may be limited and some people may require help with things like transportation, bathing, and cooking. Some people may need time away from work or limited work duties because of their condition.

Head Injuries

Head injuries are common among motorcyclists, especially in states that don’t have strict helmet laws.

Florida, for example, does not currently enforce a universal helmet law. Instead, riders age 21 and over can elect to ride without a helmet if they carry at least $10,000 in medical insurance coverage. Unfortunately, even with a helmet, head injuries are still common.

Head injuries range from minor concussions to traumatic head injuries (TBI). While concussions are usually minor and only require a few weeks rest, TBIs are can result in a multitude of problems for victims including:

  • Increased intracranial pressure—swelling of the brain can cause further injury.
  • Neurochemical problems—disruption of brain chemistry, which can affect the chemical substances that communicate within the central nervous system.
  • Natural plasticity—the brain’s ability to change and adapt with time.

Recovery from a head injury can take years, depending on how serious the damage is. Moreover, TBIs can result in significant physical and cognitive disabilities, limiting a person’s ability to work and enjoy activities.

Spinal Cord Injuries

guy in wheelchairMotorcyclists who suffer a spinal cord injury experience symptoms that range from pain to paralysis. The effects of a spinal cord injury depend largely on the location and severity of the injury.

Paralysis, the inability to move or feel sensation, is a common symptom among spinal cord injury victims.

Injuries high on the neck or spine can result in paralysis of the arms and legs, while injuries below the neck may only affect the abdomen and legs, partially or completely.

Paralysis often leads to other health complications including:

  • Respiratory problems
  • Loss of bladder/bowel control
  • Chronic pain
  • Circulatory problems
  • Spastic muscles
  • Sexual dysfunction

A spinal cord injury can significantly change a person’s life: gainful employment may be limited or not possible, and the person’s quality of life can suffer immensely.

If you or a loved one has suffered a motorcycle injury because of someone else’s negligence or reckless behavior, compensation may be available to cover:

  • Medical bills
  • Medical equipment (e.g., wheelchairs, respiratory equipment, etc.)
  • Lost wages / loss of earning potential
  • Pain and suffering
  • Wrongful death

Are you a Florida motorcyclist? Stay apprised of important safety information. Follow Heintz & Becker on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook

 

Collision with a Car? Five Steps to Take After a Motorcycle Accident

While cars and trucks dominate streets, roads, and highways in the US, millions of others also enjoy other forms of legal travel today whether as pedestrians, cycle enthusiasts, or motorcyclists. For those riding in traffic with larger vehicles, their vulnerability is not only obvious—but substantial; in fact, the average car today weighs over 4,000 lbs. When a collision occurs with someone on foot or traveling on two wheels, injury (and sometimes death) usually occurs.

Motorcyclists—often the owners of one or more cars themselves—are a common sight on roads today, with over eight million of the popular smaller vehicles now registered in the US. Still though, visibility is often cited as an issue in accidents, although it is the motorist’s responsibility to be aware of their surroundings in traffic at all times. Motorcyclists usually employ a variety of tactics to make themselves known, from revving their engines to wearing bright coloring or reflective stripes on helmets and shoes, adding extra lighting, and moving within lanes to avoid being in blind spots. Far too many accidents still occur though, and especially in Florida.

If you are a motorcyclist, know what to do after a collision with a car by following these five steps:

  1. Take a few moments to collect yourself and evaluate the results of the accident, along with making sure the car that hit you has pulled over too. Assess whether you or your passenger have serious injuries. If there is any doubt, an ambulance should be called.
  2. Call the police so that an official report can be filed. This also means that you have law enforcement at the location in case the other party wants to leave the scene, or is argumentative, or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  3. Call an experienced car accident attorney from a firm like Heintz & Becker as soon as possible. Keep in mind that insurance adjustors will be calling you quickly—and they should be referred to your attorney. Not speaking with adjustors on your own can be extremely beneficial to your case.
  4. Take pictures of all damage or anything that could be considered evidence before moving your motorcycle, so traffic can continue safely forward. Take pictures of any crossroads, stoplights, and major traffic details close by. It is important to get pictures of the other vehicle if possible too, along with their license plate. If there are witnesses nearby, ask for their contact information. They could be key to your case later!
  5. Trade insurance information with the other driver, as well as getting any other contact information possible.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!