Engine Size May Correlate with Motorcycle Fatalities

Even if you know nothing about motorcycles, the allure is obvious. Whether you are checking out your neighbor’s new ride or listening to an engine rev next to you in traffic, it is easy to understand the temptation to enter a whole new realm of travel.

Motorcyclists encompass a large community in the US, with millions riding and taking great pride in their bikes, so many of which bear glossy steel, growling motors, and confident riders.

Overconfidence in larger motors may be contributing to more accidents and fatalities though, according to Insurance Institute for Highway Safety information.

Trends show an increase in motorcycle deaths overall, with 2016 showing twice as many motorcyclist fatalities as 1997. This data is important as it was evident that motorcycle deaths were declining over a decade ago but began to spike up again in the late 90s, with motorcycle deaths accounting for around 13 percent of deaths on the road in 2016 statistics.

Along with alarming statistics in the rise in motorcycle deaths is a concerning relation to engine size:

“Engine sizes of motorcycles whose drivers were killed in crashes have gone up dramatically. Among motorcycle drivers killed in 2016, 33 percent drove motorcycles with engine sizes larger than 1,400 cc, compared with 9 percent in 2000 and less than 1 percent in 1990,” states IIHS information.

“Among the motorcycles whose drivers were killed in 2016, 90 percent of touring bikes had engines larger than 1,400 cc, while virtually all supersport bikes had engines of sizes 1,000 cc or smaller.”

Further data shows that 60 percent of the motorcycle crashes involved multiple vehicles. Motorcyclists over the age of 50 killed in accidents have continued to increase, settling at 36 percent in 2016.

While fatalities for the younger set have decreased (from 80 percent in 1975), in 2016 motorcyclists under the age of 30 who were killed accounted for 29 percent. Total fatalities for that year also showed that 91 percent of the motorcyclists killed were men. It is important to note also that 91 percent of motorcyclists killed in states with helmet laws were wearing their helmets at the time; for those killed in states without helmet laws, only 27 percent were wearing them.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the negligence of another driver, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.