National Safety Council Survey Examines Driver Concerns & Reported Behavior

Can you remember the last time you went an entire day—or more—without driving? Unless you live in a metropolis like New York City, it’s probably hard to think of a twelve-hour span, or much less, where you were not getting in and out of an automobile; in fact, many of us find ourselves joking at one time or another that we live in our cars. Some of us do love to drive, but generally we are in our vehicles out of total necessity. With such a constant connection to the automobile, it’s not surprising that we find ourselves worrying over traffic, becoming incensed by those who don’t follow the rules, along with feeling concern over whether we and our family members are safe on the roads.

NSF Surveyed Over 2,000 US Citizens

Earlier this year, the National Safety Council performed a survey meant to explore the concerns of today’s motorists, along with their behavior on the roads. The Council created the survey for help in making future policies, as well as developing educational programs and more—all centered around preventing car crashes and related deaths.

Drunk, Distracted & Drugged Drivers Are Major Concerns

With just over 2,000 surveys taken, the NSC administration learned that most individuals spend 30 minutes to under an hour in the car on weekdays. They also pinpoint concerns of those surveyed to focus heavily on driving as a safety issue, worrying individuals about family members on the roads. Many different driver issues, often associated with substances or mood, worried those taking the survey. Topping the list were concerns over drunk, distracted, and ‘drugged’ drivers, along with those suffering from road rage, exhaustion, and inexperience.

Few Surveyed Had Been in an Accident or Driven Under the Influence

Surprisingly, 76 percent of those surveyed stated they had not been in an accident in the past few years. The majority said they had not driven drunk, while the ten percent who confessed to doing so stated they did so unsafely (48 percent), nearly had accidents (47 percent), or did have wrecks (43 percent). Few said they had driven under the influence of marijuana or pills.

Texting is Viewed as a Danger

Regarding texting, the group was relatively firm regarding the dangers, as well as fiddling with hands-free or voice-only devices. Over half thought both of those activities were too dangerous to do while driving. 39 percent surveyed thought it safe to use voice commands, while only 5 percent found texting while driving acceptable.

Individuals participating in the survey were middle-class on the average, with 51 percent being women. The information was taken from individuals surveyed around the US.

Contact Us Now for Help

If you or a loved one have been seriously injured in an auto accident, please call Heintz & Becker for a free consultation with one of our personal injury attorneys. We handle all types of Florida personal injury cases, and our law firm has established an impressive record of verdicts and settlements. If you have been seriously injured, call us now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

 

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.