CRPS Often Occurs After Musculoskeletal Injury

Complex regional pain syndrome is a rare condition that confounds many in the beginning; after all, if you are suffering from CRPS, it may have been quite surprising to you to heal from a sprain, a break, or a mild musculoskeletal injury, only to be stricken with something worse. While a muscle injury or a fracture can often be inconsequential in the scope of your health overall, getting over these issues can take a toll—and there is a healing period involved—meaning that when CRPS arises suddenly, most patients are not just surprised, they are extremely disappointed to have to deal with another health issue.

Following a musculoskeletal injury, CRPS symptoms can be extremely uncomfortable and painful. Affecting only around 200,000 people in the US, CRPS is also without any specific diagnostics, apart from noting superficial symptoms. Testing involves ruling out other diseases first, but an experienced doctor who has seen CRPS before will probably be alerted by symptoms like sudden skin issues, to include inflammation, swelling, strange growth of hair (or nails), and even strange discoloration which can cause the skin to turn bluish or pinkish, with the texture becoming glossy or even thin and fragile in appearance.

Previous injuries may have rendered a CRPS patient immobile for a short time, but as the condition progresses, it may become so painful to move around that they become reluctant to do so at any point. This can cause serious atrophy in the muscles and limbs, along with other issues such as dystonia, with toes or fingers fixed in an unnatural position. These types of problems cause further distress to the patient who may then become self-conscious, beginning a vicious cycle of both physical and emotional issues.

Many different types of treatment can be offered for CRPS, beginning with over-the-counter medications, and then graduating to stronger prescriptions if necessary. Other treatments may help too, like corticosteroids, anticonvulsants, and in many cases antidepressants too, in helping to deal with the understandable depression that may accompany CRPS. Different types of therapy are available too, from more traditional mental therapy sessions to physical therapy, as well as alternative methods like biofeedback or mirror therapy.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Physical Therapy May Change Your Life if You Have CRPS

Complex regional pain syndrome is unknown to many around the world, with around 200,000 people suffering from this rare condition. It is a unique disease and one that it is often triggered by something else, like a car accident or other trauma-causing physical injury, although they may be relatively mild in many cases. You may be very surprised to find out that you are being diagnosed with CRPS as whatever injury you had seemed to have already healed; for instance, you may have been in a car wreck and broken an arm or a leg, or you may have only suffered a small sprain.

The injury may heal without any complication, and you may be back to normal temporarily, with the sudden surprise of a variety of different symptoms cropping up due to the emergence of CRPS—presenting itself in a variety of ways, but often beginning with skin abnormalities like discoloration, redness, swelling, and itching. There may be muscle and joint aches and pains, loss of mobility, and other strange and uncomfortable issues like dystonia, where fingers or toes may become curled in an unnatural position.

One of the distinguishing features of CRPS also, not surprising due to its name, is the advent of terrible and chronic pain. As a CRPS patient, you may be so uncomfortable that you are afraid to do anything that brings on agony, whether that is just the slightest movement, or taking a walk—or even having someone brush up against your skin. This is a problem because of the lack of mobility or motivation to move around may then result in muscle atrophy. While there are numerous treatments that may help CRPS, including steroids, over-the-counter treatments opioids, anticonvulsants, and more, physical therapy is often recommended, with a long list of other associated alternatives too.

Conventional physical therapy involves working with medical professionals familiar with CRPS to exercise the affected areas gently and begin helping you to increase circulation in the area and eventually regain mobility, especially in conjunction with any helpful medications. Other therapies may help too, like spinal cord stimulation, biofeedback, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car accident due to the negligence of another driver that brought on CRPS after your initial injuries healed, contact the attorneys at Heintz & Becker. We’ve helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses after accidents. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help!

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Did CRPS Kick in After a Car Accident?

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a unique condition affecting around 200,000 people in the US. Unless you or a loved one have suffered from CRPS, you would, fortunately, probably have no idea what it is. Strangely, the potentially debilitating condition usually emerges just after a limb is fractured or sprained in a trauma—such as a car accident. The patient is usually surprised and confused, not to mention extremely disappointed to have what could be a serious physical issue presenting itself just when they thought they were healed from something minor—or at the very least, not long-term and debilitating in any way.

Triggers are usually apparent, as in the case of a car accident and an obvious injury, with CRPS having caused what could only be termed as an ‘over-reaction’ in so many patients, with the original pain becoming exponentially magnified. For some, CRPS could even be triggered by a blood draw or the most minor of medical procedures—along with other more substantial surgeries, to include amputations. Diagnosis may not be easy in some cases though, and especially since there is not a specific test for the condition. Rather than arriving at a definitive diagnosis due to a positive indication on a test, medical professionals must instead rule out other similar conditions like Lyme disease.

While just figuring out what is wrong initially can be exhausting, greater success in treatment has been noted with early diagnosis. CRPS patients may suffer from so much pain that they have trouble functioning in their daily lives—and along with that, they may become so frightened of experiencing agonizing pain that they are reluctant to walk or move around. This may cause a vicious cycle of muscle loss and even complete atrophy. Patients may experience inflammation, swelling, muscle spasms, and awkward symptoms like dystonia where a hand or foot becomes twisted in a fixed position.

Treatments may include simple relief like over-the-counter medication or more serious pain pills like opioids. Corticosteroids, anticonvulsants, and even antidepressants may be prescribed, along with a wide range of different therapies, some of which are conventional physical therapies—and others which are more alternative but highly effective in some cases.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

 

Central Nervous System Damage May Cause CRPS

Complex regional pain syndrome is a condition that may plague patients long-term with a variety of unique and uncomfortable symptoms. Many are centered around the skin in terms of more topical discomfort like sensitivity to touch (and this may be even the slightest bit of contact—or even as extreme as exposure to a light breeze), discoloration, swelling, and more. And while that may seem intolerable enough, pain can be chronic and extreme too, affecting the joints and muscles and even making it difficult to move around.

While CRPS can be confounding in many ways, affecting around 200,000 people in the US, experts consider it to be caused by damage to the central nervous system, with Type 1 often being caused by a trauma like a car accident (with gray area in regards to ‘direct nerve damage’) or in some cases even a minor medical procedure like a blood draw, and Type 2 being related to known central nerve damage in cases such as a surgery or other defining event. For some patients, the condition may be self-limiting but for others it could last indefinitely and cause significant issues; in fact, the pain may sometimes be so terrible that those afflicted with CRPS dread trying to walk simply because of the agony they associate with movement.

Patients may experience moderate to severe pain in Type 1 or Type 2, but diagnosis of the rare condition is not always easy at first as other diseases (such as Lyme) must be ruled out first. There is no actual test for CRPS, and it could take months or even years to diagnose, unfortunately. Treatment usually includes pain relievers first, although they could be as simple as over-the-counter medications. If OTC pain relievers do not work or if the CRPS pain is too severe from the outset, doctors may prescribe a variety of other treatments to include opioids, steroids like prednisone, nerve-blockers, and even antidepressants or anticonvulsants. Therapies may be in order too, including conventional physical therapy for muscles that may be painful or even beginning to atrophy, along with more alternative treatments like biofeedback.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

My Arm is Tingling and Numb After a Blood Draw—Could This Be CRPS?

Complex regional pain syndrome is more aptly named than many conditions. It can be very complex, and it does center around pain, which can be chronic and extreme in some cases, leading patients to be debilitated after what may have been a minor injury or procedure; in fact, car accidents are a common type of trauma that can lead to Type 1 CRPS. Symptoms usually arrive out of the blue and surprise patients who thought that they had healed from a fracture or a sprain yet suddenly are forced to deal with pain and complications in the area of the limb previously affected.

Type 2 CRPS is usually caused by direct injury to a nerve, and even minor medical procedures such as shots or blood draws have been known to bring it on. Symptoms may begin with discomfort in the skin. It may be extremely sensitive to the touch, as well as discolored (whether red, pinkish, or even with tinges of blue) or glossy in appearance and swollen. Tingling sensations are common symptoms, along with shooting pains in the affected limb. While the onset may have been caused by something seemingly minor, CRPS can develop into a nightmarish and long-term condition that is both chronic and progressive. Pain may be so bad that patients become afraid to move around, causing a vicious cycle with muscle atrophy.

Joint pain and painful muscle spasms may affect the patient, along with dystonia—a condition affecting fingers and toes that become fixed in a twisted or abnormal position, causing even more discomfort and self-consciousness in terms of walking and getting around or going out in public. CRPS can be hard to diagnose though as there is no specific test for this rare condition affecting only 200,000 individuals in the US. Once other diseases such as Lyme disease have been ruled out, doctors are able to confirm whether a patient is suffering from CRPS or not.

Early treatment is recommended for a better outcome, and physical therapy may play a major role in recovery too, along with more alternative applications. Effective medications for CRPS vary from mild over-the-counter pain relievers to more serious treatments like anticonvulsants, antidepressants, opioids, and more.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

CRPS is Chronic and Progressive in Many Cases

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) affects a relatively small number of people in the US, with up to around 200,000 cases currently known. If you or a loved one are affected by this condition, then statistics probably mean very little to you or offer much comfort—especially if debilitating pain and suffering are involved.

CRPS can be a confounding condition. It is usually brought on by a trauma like a car accident or a motorcycle crash, and is separated into two different types, with the first usually triggered after a health issue has healed from a car accident, medical procedure, or other injury—and often a mild one. This type of CRPS is often a major—and unwelcome—surprise; in fact, if this is the case for you, there may have just been a sense of relief over getting over a sprain or a break, only to have CRPS rear its ugly head seemingly out of nowhere. The second type of CRPS is usually triggered after direct harm to a nerve occurs. This could happen during a surgery or some other event where it was obvious right away that a nerve had been damaged and CRPS was the result.

While some forms of CRPS can be mild, this condition is known to be chronic and usually affects an arm or leg, or hands and feet. In most cases, symptoms begin with discomfort and burning around the limb that was hurt, and because the immune system is affected along with the central nervous system, there may be redness and swelling, along with extreme sensitivity to touch. Early diagnosis and treatment usually result in a better outcome, but diagnosis can be challenging until all other diseases have been ruled out. Medication may include over-the-counter pain relievers or much stronger regimens, including opioids, nerve blockers, and even anticonvulsants or antidepressants.

CRPS may worsen over time, and muscles may even begin to atrophy. While some patients may experience loss of mobility, others may become reluctant to move around, fearing the pain involved in getting up or walking around. Dystonia is another example of the progression of CRPS, with fingers or toes sometimes becoming fixed in an abnormal or twisted position. This may affect just one area or a group of muscles.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

 

CRPS: Even the Slightest Touch May Invoke Pain

Complex regional pain syndrome affects a small number of people in comparison to other more widespread conditions, but with 200,000 people (at least) suffering, that still means a lot of patients are living in discomfort. CRPS is not only considered rare, but extremely unique. Often, the patient may have experienced something traumatic like a car accident or motorcycle crash that resulted in an injury paling in comparison to the suffering caused by CRPS.

While a broken or even sprained ankle may cause considerable pain and inconvenience in mobility, it is an injury that usually heals without complication. If you have been stricken with CRPS, you may have been shocked to experience its onset in lieu of a health issue that dissipated. The symptoms can range from moderate to extremely painful and debilitating, whether you suffer from Type 1 (after an injury that occurred with little known nerve damage) or Type 2 (after an incident causing direct, known nerve damage). Epidermal pain is common, to the extent that even a breeze blowing on your arm or leg may be painful. Even the lightest touch or a bit of fabric making contact may cause torture.

Such discomfort is unusual and while you may not understand it, it may be even harder for those closer to you to comprehend your pain—and on top of that, medical professionals may be challenged to give you an initial diagnosis, with no specific testing available aside from ruling out other conditions. Treatments span a variety of different medications and therapies, depending on the severity of CRPS. Typical signs of this condition include not only discomfort at the epidermal level, but also throbbing and swelling in the affected areas, as well as considerable joint stiffness and pain. If you have CRPS, mobility could become such a challenge that you become reluctant to walk or move around, resulting in atrophy of muscles. Other related problems could arise, such as dystonia, causing fingers or toes to become paralyzed in an abnormal and fixed position.

Early diagnosis and treatment are suggested for CRPS, so seek medical help as soon as possible if you are experiencing symptoms. This could be a condition that continues to progress and worsen over time for some and may even result in the need for antidepressants or therapy to help with adapting to such overwhelming physical changes and challenges.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

CRPS: Nerve Damage Pain May Last a Lifetime

Imagine being in a car crash or motorcycle accident and experiencing not only the trauma of such an event, but physical injury too. In more severe cases, motorists or passengers may be killed or sustain brain or spinal damage. Cuts and contusions and breaks and sprains are more common though and may heal right on target, with complex regional pain syndrome emerging as a complete—and very unwelcome—surprise.

CRPS brings a wide range of unique symptoms with it and is thought to be an inflammatory condition related to the immune system, brought on by initial nerve damage. In Type 1, this may occur after a trauma like a fall or a car accident; in Type 2, the nerve damage is usually obvious, along with the reason for it, like a surgery or perhaps an infection. While the limb previously associated with a break or sprain or other trauma is usually the only one afflicted by symptoms, over time, the patient may find both limbs affected—especially with movement disorders like dystonia where arms, legs, fingers, or toes become fixed in a twisted or otherwise awkward position.

Differences in the skin are often noted with the onset of CRPS, to include burning or swelling, along with sensitivity to temperature. The arm or leg may be discolored, and even glossy or thinned out in texture. Joints may feel stiff, and muscles may move unpredictably. The most prevalent symptom though is usually pain. Individuals suffering from CRPS are usually stymied by the sudden discomfort, and medical professionals may not be able to pinpoint the condition at first, being forced to rule out other problems before making a diagnosis, often with bone scans, X-rays, blood tests, and more.

For some, CRPS could just be episodic, disappearing after a short amount of time. For others though, this rare condition appears out of the blue and can make life permanently debilitating. Once the challenge of diagnosing CRPS is out of the way, the challenge of treating it follows. In milder cases, over-the-counter pain relievers may suffice—but for others, opioids may be necessary. Medical professionals may also prescribe corticosteroids, anticonvulsants, or nerve-blockers. Physical therapy can be helpful too, along with antidepressants and psychotherapy which may be especially vital for patients with chronic CRPS who are adjusting to ongoing pain and the drastic changes it has caused in their lives.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Dystonia May Develop in Connection with CRPS

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a condition fraught with uncertainty for many—especially at the beginning. Rare in that it only affects around 200,000 individuals in the US (who have reported it—there could be many others unknown) and is difficult to diagnose and sometimes to treat, CRPS can present itself with a wide range of symptoms from mild to severe. And whether a patient has Type 1 (caused by another injury that may have already healed) or Type 2 (marked by a known nerve injury), as you can probably construe from the name, pain is one of the most common issues, ranging from moderate to overwhelming pain that is treated with everything from over-the-counter pain relievers to opioids, and more, including a variety of different physical therapies.

Early Treatment of CRPS Can Lead to Better Outcome

Early diagnosis can be critical in treating CRPS which often shows initial symptoms related to skin which may be increasingly sensitive or even feel as if it is burning. The skin temperature may be cold or clammy, and there may be a blue or pinkish tinge along with a glossy texture on the affected limb. If the condition continues to evolve, serious muscular problems may arise, and the patient may be tempted to stop using an arm or hand or even be fearful of walking if one or both legs or feet are affected. While that is understandable, limiting the use of arms or legs could lead to atrophy and further complications for those suffering from CRPS.

Dystonia is a Common Symptom of CRPS

As muscles in the affected limb atrophy, other conditions may occur too, such as dystonia—marked by spasms and involuntary twisting, usually in a single area like the hand or foot, or fingers or toes of the affected limb; according to the Mayo Clinic. Dystonia can also affect many other areas of the body too such as the neck, causing it to be pulled in an awkward position. While in CRPS usually only the extremities are impacted, the condition has also been known to affect the jaw and tongue, and in some cases even the eyelids.

Dystonia May Affect Multiple Limbs

Research has shown that dystonia affects the majority of CRPS patients suffering from movement disorders—and that it also tends to present itself in patients who develop CRPS at a younger age. Such patients may also be vulnerable to experiencing dystonia in other limbs. Trauma such as a car accident injury is often to blame for CRPS, leading to sprains or fractures (or even more extreme issues like amputations) that may heal without major concern—only to see this rare condition occur later, prompting a surprising and even debilitating amount of pain. CRPS can be chronic and long-term, and medical treatment should be sought as soon as you begin to experience possible symptoms.

Contact Us for Help

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome—Also Known as Causalgia or RSD

Complex regional pain syndrome or causalgia is known to affect around 200,000 individuals in the U.S. today. Those numbers may be low due to underreporting of the condition or lack of true diagnosis, but the fact remains that it is a rare condition. CRPS is characterized by chronic pain that is often so bad patients become afraid to move or walk, resulting in further complications due to atrophy.

Original nerve damage may be due to a car accident injury or a surgery or other event. CRPS usually erupts not only painfully but also as a surprise to the individual who may have had a sprain or a break that already healed, only to find themselves later dealing with a health problem that is much worse. Symptoms often occur topically and internally; for example, unique changes to the skin are usually an indicator of CRPS, whether through color changes or transformation in texture. The skin often becomes so sensitive to touch that just the slightest contact with anything is painful. Joints and muscles may be affected too, and often severely so.

The condition is separated into two types, which also have alternative terms attached to them:

  • Type 1 CRPS – Ninety percent of the patients affected with CRPS have Type 1, also known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD). The Mayo Clinic describes this type as one that occurs ‘after an illness or injury that didn’t directly damage the nerves in your affected limb.’
  • Type 2 CRPS – This CRPS type has been referred to as causalgia in the past. It usually presents itself directly after an injury to a nerve, and without as much mystery about the painful onset.

If you are suffering from CRPS, it is important to get treatment as soon as possible for a successful outcome. Your doctor may diagnose CRPS through a CT, MRI, or a bone scan and then begin a regimen of treatment depending on the severity.

Were you in an accident due to the negligence of others that triggered CRPS? If so, please call Heintz & Becker today to consult with a skilled CRPS lawyer. Our attorneys have helped victims from Bradenton, Sarasota, and all over Florida get compensation for their damages and medical expenses. Call us for a free consultation now at 941-748-2916 or contact us online. We are here to help, and if you cannot come to us, we will come to you.

All blogs are written on behalf of Heintz & Becker for informational purposes. These articles should not, however, be considered legal advice, or in any way responsible for creating an attorney/client relationship.